How do Norwegian names work?

The most common Norwegian surnames were originally patronymic, commonly ending with the suffixes “-ssen”, “-sson”, “-sdatter”, “-sdotter” which is the genitive s plus the word sen or son for son or datter or dotter for daughter. … In 1923, it was ordered by law that each family should have a single, hereditary last name.

Why do Norwegians have two surnames?

Some people did go back to their farm surname when they got older though. Because of this practice, in many Norwegian records a surname is crossed through with another surname written after it in reference to the 1875law.

How do Nordic surnames work?

The patronymic naming system was used in all of Scandinavia. That means a Scandinavian’s family name was formed by taking the first name of the natural father and adding sen, son, sson, søn, datter, dotter, or dottir to it. … They carried their maiden surname throughout their life in the records.

How do Norwegian middle names work?

Middle Name: A middle name in Norway is either a patronym or an additional family name, for example the father’s family name if the last name is the mother’s family name. Additional given names not in daily use are not middle names in the Norwegian naming system (like in the USA), but are part of the given name(s).

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How many names do Norwegians have?

Why do so many Norwegians have two first names which they use in full – eg Emil Hegle Svendsen, Ole Einar Bjørndalen and Johannes Thingnes Boe (but not his older brother Tarjei Boe)?

What is the most common last name in Norway?

Norway

Rank Surname Type
1 Hansen patronymic
2 Johansen patronymic
3 Olsen patronymic
4 Larsen patronymic

Why do Nordic names end in son?

Sweden abounds in names ending in “-son” because of an old Nordic practice, before hereditary surnames were introduced, of using the father’s first name, and the suffix “-son” for a son, or “-dotter” for a daughter. … The government, which must approve all name changes, places certain names off limits.

What does Dottir mean in Icelandic names?

Iceland is very unique in terms of how it names its sons and daughters. … If you are the daughter of Magnus, your last name would be Magnussdottir (dottir translates to daughter). The patronymic system means that Icelanders are really a first-name kind of country.

What are some Norwegian surnames?

The statistics: Most popular Norwegian surnames

  • Hansen (53,011)
  • Johansen (50,088)
  • Olsen (49,303)
  • Larsen (37,869)
  • Andersen (37,025)
  • Pedersen (35,145)
  • Nilsen (34,734)
  • Kristiansen (23,397)

What does Moen mean in Norwegian?

Norwegian: habitational name from any of numerous farmsteads all over Norway, so named from the definite singular form of mo, from Old Norse mór ‘plain’, ‘moor’, ‘heath’.

What are some Viking last names?

Norman family names of Viking origin

Norman family name Scandinavian origin and meaning (if known)
Ingouf, Igouf, Yngouf, Ygouf, Youf Ingolf (God Ing’s wolf, warrior)
Néel Njall
Onfroy, Onfroi Unfrid (the one who gives peace)
Osmond, Osmont Osmund (unde God’s protection)
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What are some Viking surnames?

According to Origins of English Surnames and A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances, English surnames that have their source in the language of the Norse invaders include: Algar, Allgood, Collings, Copsey, Dowsing, Drabble, Eetelbum, Gamble, Goodman, Grave, Grime, Gunn, Hacon, …

What does son of Jens mean?

Meaning: God is Gracious; Son of Jens. Origin: Hebrew Scandinavian.

Is Miller a Viking name?

English and Scottish: occupational name for a miller. The standard modern vocabulary word represents the northern Middle English term, an agent derivative of mille ‘mill’, reinforced by Old Norse mylnari (see Milner). In southern, western, and central England Millward (literally, ‘mill keeper’) was the usual term.

Are middle names common in Norway?

No, Norwegians did not usually have middle names. The normal pattern would be: given name, patronym (name of father +son/sen or dotter/datter) + name of farm. If the family moved, the name of the farm would change to the new farm name.

When did Norwegians get last names?

In 1923, the Norwegian government mandated all Norwegian families to choose a last name they could pass down from generation to generation. Families either stuck with their current patronymic last name, but some chose the farm or other place they lived.