When did Brits go to New Zealand?

Whalers, missionaries, and traders followed, and in 1840 Britain formally annexed the islands and established New Zealand’s first permanent European settlement at Wellington.

When did the British people come to New Zealand?

British explorer James Cook, who reached New Zealand in October 1769 on the first of his three voyages, was the first European to circumnavigate and map New Zealand. From the late 18th century, the country was regularly visited by explorers and other sailors, missionaries, traders and adventurers.

How long have the British been in New Zealand?

1. The General Assembly first sat in 1854, under the provisions of the New Zealand Constitution Act 1852. The Colony of New Zealand was a British colony that existed in New Zealand from 1841 to 1907.

When did settlers come to New Zealand?

The first settlers probably arrived from Polynesia between 1200 and 1300 AD. They discovered New Zealand as they explored the Pacific, navigating by the ocean currents, winds and stars.

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Why did European settlers come to New Zealand?

The first European to sight New Zealand was Dutch explorer Abel Tasman. He was on an expedition to discover a great Southern continent ‘Great South Land’ that was believed to be rich in minerals.

Why did British settlers come to New Zealand?

Later, the British Government encouraged British families to come here. The British Government thought that Aotearoa would be a good base in the Pacific for Britain. Many British families packed their bags and boarded ships to start a new life in a land they had never seen on the other side of the world.

Why did the British go to NZ?

Promoting New Zealand

To combat negative notions about New Zealand, the company used books, pamphlets and broadsheets to promote the country as ‘a Britain of the South’, a fertile land with a benign climate, free of starvation, class war and teeming cities.

When did New Zealand separate from Australia?

On 1 July 1841 the islands of New Zealand were separated from the Colony of New South Wales and made a colony in their own right. This ended more than 50 years of confusion over the relationship between the islands and the Australian colony.

Does England own New Zealand?

Following the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, the islands of New Zealand became a British colony. … The Statute of Westminster in 1931, an act of the British Parliament, gave legal form to this declaration. It gave New Zealand and other Dominions the authority to make their own laws. New Zealand ratified the Statute in 1947.

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When did NZ stop being a colony?

On 26 September 1907 the colony of New Zealand ceased to exist. New Zealand became a dominion within the British Empire.

Who was in NZ before the Māori?

Before that time and until the 1920s, however, a small group of prominent anthropologists proposed that the Moriori people of the Chatham Islands represented a pre-Māori group of people from Melanesia, who once lived across all of New Zealand and were replaced by the Māori .

When did Moriori arrive in NZ?

The people who became the Moriori arrived on the islands from Eastern Polynesia and New Zealand around 1400 AD. They had no contact with other people for about 400 years, and developed their own distinct culture.

Who were the original inhabitants of New Zealand?

Māori were the first inhabitants of New Zealand or Aotearoa, guided by Kupe the great navigator. Learn more about the arrival of Māori.

When did white man settle in New Zealand?

Abel Tasman was the first of the European explorers known to have reached New Zealand, in December 1642.

What diseases did the British bring to New Zealand?

Smallpox and plague were quickly contained on the rare occasions they were identified. However significant diseases were brought, including venereal infections, measles, influenza, typhoid fever (enteric fever), dysentery and tuberculosis.

What was New Zealand called before?

Hendrik Brouwer proved that the South American land was a small island in 1643, and Dutch cartographers subsequently renamed Tasman’s discovery Nova Zeelandia from Latin, after the Dutch province of Zeeland. This name was later anglicised to New Zealand.

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