How safe is Bergen Norway?

Is Bergen a safe place?

Overall crime rate city ranking

The overall crime rate puts Bergen in position 85 of 266 Teleport Cities in a ranking for the safest cities.

What should I avoid in Norway?

11 Things Tourists Should Never Do in Norway

  • Expect to buy strong alcohol at the supermarket…
  • …or even beer, at certain hours and certain days.
  • Say anything negative about the King, ever.
  • Get a taxi without checking their budget first.
  • Drink publicly on a weekday.
  • Only eat at burger places and pølse (hot dog) stands.

Is Oslo or Bergen better?

Although Oslo may top Bergen with its highly innovative buildings and history, Bergen is no doubt far more scenic than Oslo. Seven mountains surround Bergen (yes, seven), and the most easily visited is Fløyen, which is reachable by funicular.

What are the dangers of Norway?

Norway is a very safe country to travel to. Its crime rates are low, and the most likely crimes that you’ll encounter are petty theft and car break-ins. Still, you should be wary of pickpockets, since they are an increasing issue in larger cities and towns, especially during summer.

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Is it nice to live in Bergen?

While the cost of living in Norway is high compared to many other countries around the world, wages are, generally, higher too. Bergen has a very low crime rate and is a family-friendly city, with a natural playground on its doorstep. All of these reasons make it a destination of choice for many expats.

Where should I live in Bergen?

These are some of the most popular neighbourhoods for residents and tourists alike in central Bergen.

  • Sentrum (The Centre) Unsurprisingly, living in the centre of town is hugely popular. …
  • Fjellsiden. …
  • Sandviken. …
  • Nordnes. …
  • Solheimsviken. …
  • Nygårdshøyden. …
  • Møhlenpris.

Is Norway a nice place to live?

It is ranked as one of the best countries to live in and has one of the lowest crime rates in the world. All the more reason to Study in Norway! In recent years, Norway has repeatedly been ranked as ‘the best country to live in’ by the United Nations Human Development Report.

Who is King of Norway?

Harald V of Norway. Harald V (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈhɑ̂rːɑɫ dɛn ˈfɛ̂mtə]; born 21 February 1937) is the King of Norway. He acceded to the throne on 17 January 1991. Harald was the third child and only son of King Olav V and Princess Märtha of Sweden.

What are the do’s and don’ts in Norway?

Norway has its set of Do’s and Don’ts too. Here are a few.

  • Motorcyclists always greet each other by waiving their left hand when passing each other on the road.
  • Norwegians usually do not greet strangers when passing them in the street while walking. …
  • Don’t jump the queue. …
  • Don’t complain about the prices.
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Is Bergen expensive?

Summary about cost of living in Bergen, Norway: Family of four estimated monthly costs are 4,457$ (39,703kr) without rent. A single person estimated monthly costs are 1,238$ (11,033kr) without rent. Bergen is 1.89% less expensive than New York (without rent).

What is Bergen Norway known for?

Bergen is famous for its university, which in turn is famous for its world-renowned museum collections. Well worth spending a day at, the University Museum of Bergen (Universitetsmuseet i Bergen) includes the Natural History Collection, the Cultural History Collection, and the Seafaring Museum.

Can I see Northern Lights in Bergen?

It is geographically possible to see the northern lights in popular destinations like Oslo and Bergen. … In Bergen, a city on the shores of a fjord, the light pollution isn’t as bad as in Oslo, so you may have a good chance of seeing the northern lights if they’re strong enough.

Is Norway an English speaking country?

The vast majority of Norwegians speak English in addition to Norwegian – and generally on a very high level. Many university degree programmes and courses are taught in English.

Can you drink Glacier Water Norway?

Most running water in the mountains of Norway is clean enough to drink, but avoid water running through pastures or runoff from glaciers, as this may contain harmful microorganisms.