What are Sweden last names?

What are some Sweden last names?

Here is a list of the most common last names found in Sweden.

  • Andersson, meaning ‘son of Anders or Andrews. …
  • Arvidsson, meaning ‘son of Arvid’.
  • Berg, meaning ‘mountain. …
  • Bjorklund, meaning ‘ Forest of birches’.
  • Claesson, meaning ‘ son of Claes’. …
  • Danielsson, meaning ‘son of Daniel’.
  • Gustafsson, meaning ‘ son of Gustav.

What is the most common last name in Sweden?

Sweden

Rank Surname Number of bearers 2012
1 Andersson 251,621
2 Johansson 251,495
3 Karlsson 223,151
4 Nilsson 171,360

What are Viking last names?

Norman family names of Viking origin

Norman family name Scandinavian origin and meaning (if known)
Ingouf, Igouf, Yngouf, Ygouf, Youf Ingolf (God Ing’s wolf, warrior)
Néel Njall
Onfroy, Onfroi Unfrid (the one who gives peace)
Osmond, Osmont Osmund (unde God’s protection)

What name is illegal in Sweden?

In protest against Sweden’s strict naming laws, in 1991 Elisabeth Hallin and Lasse Diding decided to name their newborn ‘Brfxxccxxmnpcccclllmmnprxvclmnckssqlbb11116’, pronounced, of course, as Albin. Funnily enough, they were not allowed to register the name, and ended up with a 5000 kroner (around $740) fine.

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Why do Swedish names end in son?

Sweden abounds in names ending in “-son” because of an old Nordic practice, before hereditary surnames were introduced, of using the father’s first name, and the suffix “-son” for a son, or “-dotter” for a daughter. … While some Swedes like Ms.

Is Smith a Swedish name?

Smith is a surname originating in England and Ireland. It is the most prevalent surname in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, and the fifth most common surname in the Republic of Ireland.

What is a good Swedish last name?

Svensson, Johansson, Gustavsson belong to the most common last names in Sweden. (Source: SCB.)

List of 100 Most Common Swedish Surnames.

Rank Lastname Count
1 Andersson 238 843
2 Johansson 238 259
3 Karlsson 212 126
4 Nilsson 163 029

How do Viking last names work?

Vikings did not have surnames as we know them today. They used the patronymic system or more rarely, a metronymic was used. … Patronymics, son of or daughter of (father’s name), were far more common than a matronymic, which would be son of or daughter of (mother’s name).

Do all Icelandic names end in son or Dottir?

The last name of a male Icelanders therefore usually ends in the suffix -son (“son”) and that of female Icelanders in -dóttir (“daughter”). For example, Iceland’s current president is Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, his first name is Ólafur Ragnar and his father’s first name was Grímur.

What are Dutch last names?

Top 10 most common Dutch surnames

  1. De Jong. (86,534 in 2007) De Jong in 2007. …
  2. Jansen. (75,698 in 2007) Jansen in 2007. …
  3. De Vries. (73,152 in 2007) De Vries in 2007. …
  4. Van de Berg / van den Berg / van der Berg. (60,135 in 2007) …
  5. Van Dijk. (57,879 in 2007) …
  6. Bakker. (56,864 in 2007) …
  7. Janssen. (55,394 in 2007) …
  8. Visser. (50,929 in 2007)
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What are good Japanese last names?

Japan’s top 100 most common family names

  • Sato.
  • Suzuki.
  • Takahashi.
  • Tanaka.
  • Watanabe.
  • Ito.
  • Yamamoto.
  • Nakamura.

Is Anderson a Scandinavian name?

Anderson is the eighth most frequent surname in Scotland and 52nd most common in England. … The Scandinavian forms Andersson and Andersen were often rendered as Anderson by immigrants to the English-speaking countries, whereby the latter form became one of the most common surnames in Anglophone North America.

Is anyone named Google?

A Swedish couple have named their newborn after their favorite technology company–Google. Walid Elias Kai, who has a doctorate in search engine marketing, and his wife Carol of Kalmar, Sweden, have named their son Oliver Google Kai, Google blogger Karen Wickre wrote in an official blog on the subject.

Is Brfxxccxxmnpcccclllmmnprxvclmnckssqlbb11116 a name?

Brfxxccxxmnpcccclllmmnprxvclmnckssqlbb11116, ostensibly pronounced [ˈǎlːbɪn] (“Albin”), is a name intended for a Swedish child who was born in 1991. Parents Elisabeth Hallin and Lasse Diding gave their child this name to protest a fine, imposed in accordance with the naming law in Sweden.

Why is it illegal to name your child IKEA in Sweden?

Thanks to the country’s Naming law, enacted in 1982, parents can’t name their children first names that “can be supposed to cause discomfort for the one using it.” While the law was originally created to keep families from naming their kids after Swedish royalty, it now basically serves to keep name-related awkwardness …