You asked: How did the British affect New Zealand?

In 1642, Dutch navigator Abel Tasman became the first European to discover the South Pacific island group that later became known as New Zealand. … Whalers, missionaries, and traders followed, and in 1840 Britain formally annexed the islands and established New Zealand’s first permanent European settlement at Wellington.

How did the British take control of New Zealand?

On 21 May 1840 Hobson proclaimed British sovereignty over all of New Zealand – over the North Island on the basis of cession through the Treaty of Waitangi, and over the southern islands by ‘right of discovery’. Signatures to the Treaty were still being sought.

How did colonization affect New Zealand?

Loss of land

Deprived of their land, tribes were in many instances reduced to poverty, with no option but to live in overcrowded and unhygienic conditions. Losing land, they also lost access to traditional food sources. Lack of resources, overcrowding and poor diet helped disease to take hold and spread.

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How did British rule impact Australia and New Zealand?

What effect did colonization have on Australia’s indigenous population? … The colonies united into the independent Commonwealth of Australia. Britain annexed New Zealand. As colonists poured in, the took more and more land, leading to fierce wars with Maori.

How was New Zealand affected by imperialism?

Within the time of 100 years, British Imperialism helped turn New Zealand from an island full of savages into an economic and trading powerhouse with its own government and European-like society, while allowing the native Maori people to live on in their native land.

What impact did the Europeans have on NZ?

As Europeans settled in New Zealand, they brought more changes to the remaining forests, animal diversity and landscape stability. Along with immigrants came new animals, crop plants, parasites and diseases. The remaining lowland forests and scrubland were burnt, drained, logged and cleared for farms and cropping.

Why did the British colonize New Zealand?

Britain was motivated by the desire to forestall the New Zealand Company and other European powers (France established a very small settlement at Akaroa in the South Island later in 1840), to facilitate settlement by British subjects and, possibly, to end the lawlessness of European (predominantly British and American) …

What diseases did the British bring to New Zealand?

Smallpox and plague were quickly contained on the rare occasions they were identified. However significant diseases were brought, including venereal infections, measles, influenza, typhoid fever (enteric fever), dysentery and tuberculosis.

When did New Zealand leave the British Empire?

The year 2007, while it marks the centenary of New Zealand’s transition from colony to Dominion, also marks 60 years since New Zealand passed the Statute of Westminster Adoption Act 1947 and gained legal and formal independence from Britain in the exercise of its external affairs.

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What role did New Zealand play in the British Empire?

New Zealand played a small but useful part in the British Empire’s war effort, and its essential war aim was achieved with the defeat of Germany and its allies in late 1918. The war had a major impact on constitutional arrangements within the British Empire, and it affected New Zealand’s international status.

What did the British Empire trade with New Zealand?

In the later 19th century New Zealand developed a trade in frozen meat, butter and cheese to Britain, and the proportion of its exports going to Britain rose. … At an empire economic conference, held in Ottawa in 1932 and attended by representatives from the dominions, reciprocal trade preferences were agreed to.

How influential was the British Empire?

The British empire was one of the most important developments in world history. The empire was huge, it lasted a long time and it brought tremendous changes to many parts of the world. For millions of people the world today is the way it is because of the impact of the British empire.

What was New Zealand called before?

Hendrik Brouwer proved that the South American land was a small island in 1643, and Dutch cartographers subsequently renamed Tasman’s discovery Nova Zeelandia from Latin, after the Dutch province of Zeeland. This name was later anglicised to New Zealand.

Who really discovered New Zealand?

The dutch explorer Abel Tasman is officially recognised as the first European to ‘discover’ New Zealand in 1642. His men were the first Europeans to have a confirmed encounter with Māori.

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